Tag Archives: Automotive Cyber Security

Automotive Cyber Security Market: How 4 January news provide evidence of what to expect in 2016?

 

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We haven’t yet reached mid-way through the first month of 2016 but 4 key events in M&A, OEM action and standards provide clear evidence of what to look for in the Automotive Cyber Security Market over the year.


 

Timeline of key events in the Automotive Cyber Security Market in Jan 2016

Jan 6 | Harman is acquiring TowerSec for an estimated $70-75 million

Jan 6 | GM launched a cybersecurity bug bounty program which encourages researchers to find vulnerabilities in its cars and disclose them

Jan 5 | NHTSA ends 5-month investigation on Fiat-Chrysler’s automotive radios following the Jeep hack

Jan 15 | The USDOT, the NHTSA and 16 major automakers are expected to announce voluntary agreements on cybersecurity, recalls, defect reporting and proactive safety


 

Harman leads acquisitions in the marketplace, similar to 2015 

2016 started with the announcement that US-based Harman is acquiring car cybersecurity company TowerSec for an estimated $70-75 million.

Harman, which in Mar 2015 acquired another Israeli company engaged in car cyber security, Red bend, as well as Symphony Teleca, aims to integrate TowerSec’s ECUSHIELD and TCUSHIELD into its own ‘’5+1 security architecture’’ to protect connected and autonomous cars. This move demonstrates how integral cyber security is for a comprehensive Connected Car portfolio.

Ann-Arbor, Michigan-based TowerSec delivers on-board cyber security technology to OEMs, suppliers and telematics unit and service providers. The company received an undisclosed investment from IncWell back in Oct 2014 and it has cooperative agreements with British AC Cars and French SEGULA Technologies to embed its technology to their offerings.


‘’The ECUshield can be built-into smart gateways, body control modules, and other CAN-based ECUs and no additional hardware required’’

Dr Anuja Sonalker, VP of Engineering and Operations at TowerSec


2 reasons why M&A and partnerships will continue in 2016

With a government mandate in the horizon, carmakers will face an additional cost from having to integrate cybersecurity solutions into their future Connected Car offerings. Automotive Cyber Security expertise though is rare among their Tier-1 suppliers therefore demand for car cybersecurity experts will increase. This will probably lead to more partnerships or M&A over the next few years as carmakers tend to prefer having all the expertise in-house.

What is more, the viability and successful monetisation of Connected Car business models requires the incorporation of robust automotive cyber expertise and the capability to implement cyber security. This will attract further investment for cyber security experts, either in terms of capital or personnel.

GM joins Tesla in bug bounty programs

So far, Tesla was the first and only company to reward hackers with $100-$10,000 for reported bugs in its cars. Daimler has its own team of hackers testing the vulnerabilities of its vehicles since 2012.

Now GM launches a cybersecurity bug bounty program which encourages researchers to find vulnerabilities in its cars and disclose them. This comes almost after a year since a researcher named Samy Kamkar demonstrated the capabilities of remotely locating, unlocking and starting the engine of vehicles equipped with GM OnStar. In its first 8 days of the bug bounty program’s operation there have already been 2 issues identified by a researcher and already closed.


‘’In the last 6 months, the awareness level has risen much higher in the industry. We see a lot more activity in terms of the penetration testing requests we receive and also in terms of evaluation of our product’’

Ziv Levi, CEO Arilou Technologies Ltd


OEM demand for vulnerability assessments to rise in 2016- product integration follows

GM’s move demonstrates that demand for cyber expertise, both in terms of 3rd party vulnerability assessments and/or personnel, will rise even more in 2016. This will lead to more product evaluation and in some cases product integration for their next generation vehicles before the end of 2016.

Additionally, as the number of Connected Car and Connected-to-the-car devices increases, the vehicle’s attack vector will grow exponentially. OEMs realise that a collaborative approach, together with a proactive strategy can lead to more effective car cybersecurity. Thus, we expect more OEMs to follow on GM’s footsteps of GM and adopt similar practices.

The USDOT, the NHTSA and 16 major carmakers are expected to announce voluntary privacy principles on car cybersecurity

In a nutshell, no official regulation or common standards in Automotive Cyber Security exist yet. But regulators and the auto industry are working on both as demonstrated by the SPY Act in the US and the announcement of J3061 standards from SAE International.

Following a record 63.95 million vehicle recall in the United States in 2014 and multiple fines for safety violations, the government and the car industry are working on a framework that will guide their work on cyber security, as well as safety, defect reporting and recalls. In this direction, multiple industry sources indicate that the USDOT, the NHTSA and 16 major carmakers are expected to announce voluntary agreements on Jan 15, as required by their meeting in Chicago on Dec 16.

This step reaffirms our position that Automotive Cyber Security is now a top priority for carmakers, as well as regulators, because of its implications on physical safety, the carmakers’ whole business and the transition towards more automated vehicles.

Collaborative, proactive Automotive Cyber Security is paramount, but is it realistic?

Although we view any collaborative, industry-wide agreement as a step forward, we approach this development with scepticism because of the degree of effectiveness when relying in voluntary agreements in an industry characterised by the lack of collaboration among OEMs, as in the case of Electric Vehicles.

Carmakers disagree on the effectiveness of a mandate, with some arguing that industry-wide cybersecurity guidelines and practices would be more appropriate to mitigate real-life malicious cyber-attacks than a government regulation in terms of speed of action and relevance.

But in our view, mandatory fitment of robust software and/or hardware solutions together with industry-wide standards and certification of peripheral devices can reduce organised crime’s incentives to attack cars as their probability of success and their gain from infiltrating car security will decrease significantly.

Fiat-Chrysler’s investigation ends but is there more to come?

On Jan 5, the NHTSA ended its 5-month investigation on the 1.4 million recalled Chrysler’s (FCA US LLC) models equipped with Uconnect head units (HU) 8.4A (RA3 radio) and 8.4AN (RA4 radio) manufactured by Harman International. The investigation, issued by the Office of Defects Investigation (ODI) on Jul 24 2015, aimed to ‘’examine HU security vulnerabilities and remedy effectiveness in the recalled population and to determine whether similar units have been supplied for use in other FCA vehicles’’ according to the agency.

The recall query investigation is now closed following remedies in the recall vehicle population and no findings that infotainment units sold to other companies by Harman were susceptible to hacking.


‘’The opportunity cost of management distraction, the potential loss of sales, the cost of a recall, and then potential lawsuits and/or fines from the regulators mean that OEMs must take Cyber Security seriously and act now-doing nothing is not an option’’

Mike Parris, Head of SBD Secure Car Division


Car hacking is inevitable so what can be done to secure Connected Cars?

Malicious cyber-attacks on cars from organised crime can and will move from a possibility to reality. Why?

Simply because we expect the proliferation of Connected Cars over the next ten years and considering that more than once ‘’white hat’’ researchers have demonstrated that modern Connected Cars can be hacked, there are many reasons to worry about. To put it simply, in many cases the existing in-vehicle network security needs to be upgraded to withstand the new cyber-threats arising from the introduction of the Cyber-Physical System.

Additionally, the amount of personal data (e.g. preferences, behaviour, location, even credit card details) collected and distributed over the network by Connected Cars will increase significantly over the next decade as the Internet-of-Cars develops (OTA, V2V, V2I, Autonomous).


‘’A multi-layer approach is always a good practice, starting with a holistic process of security by design which involves addressing potential threats right from the requirement and design phase of products’’

 Asaf Atzmon, VP of Business Development, TowerSec


Finally, as the number of connected-to-the-car devices increases, the vehicle’s attack vector will grow exponentially. And what’s worse, what we call Peripheral car cybersecurity will never be 100% robust. Even the smallest breach in car cybersecurity, whether it’s in-vehicle, peripheral and/or cloud security, is enough to draw the attention of sophisticated criminals who look for opportunities to monetize vulnerabilities.

Read more

To learn more about the Automotive Cyber Security market, including our forecast on the adoption of Cyber Security solutions for Connected Cars in key geographies over the next decade and insight into the evolution of the market landscape read our report:

Automotive Cyber Security Market Forecast: the secure Connected Car

For a detailed Table of Contents or Sample Pages contact us on:

(+44) (0)20 3286 4562 info@auto2xtech.com or visit auto2xtech.com

Only One Week To Go Until China Automotive Cyber Security Summit 2016

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As the “China Automotive Cyber Security Summit 2016” to be held on 21-22 Jan. 2016 in Sheraton Shanghai Hongkou Hotel giants momentum, we are very pleased to announce that the worldwide first class speakers Mr.  Chris Reeves, the Intelligent Mobility & Future Transport Technology from Horiba Mira Ltd, UK, will present the rapidly emerging challenge of cyber security for the automotive sector. With ever increasing levels of automation and connectivity there is a growth in the vulnerability and risk associated with automotive cyber security. Mr. Reeves’s presentation will look at the increasing need to address this problem and implement mitigation strategies using systematic methodologies building on ISO26262 and emerging standards.

In addition, global leading information technology company IBM and Alibaba will also present their cutting edge technology and innovative strategies on how to secure connected cars. Today’s instrumented and intelligent automobiles offer a plethora of driver features — from creature comforts like synching smart phones with vehicle systems to safety features like emergency assistance systems and real-time driver alerts.

Connected vehicles also offer advantages for automakers, such as the ability to proactively detect and respond to warranty and maintenance issues. However, along with these advances come the risks associated with system and vehicle security breaches, as well as concerns over data privacy. To mitigate such threats, the automobile industry must continue to make security a top priority by building protection against computer incursions. In fact, digital security must be infused into every step of the manufacturing process — from design through production, the supply chain and the maintenance ecosystem. Mr. Giuseppe Serio, the Global Solution Leader for Connected Vehicle Security at IBM, will bring his 25+ years professional experiences from various areas and fields, with a clear predominance in the automotive business to CACSS2016. Mr. Serio will present his prospective technological solutions on “driving security –  cyber assurance for next generation vehicles”, that you can not afford to miss out! Register Now


Other TOPICS:

• Developing prospects of Quantum communication technology

• Understand the requirement of Telematics Service Providers

• Dynamics of Internet companies and cyber security companies around connected car conceptions

• The latest standards and regulations of connected car and cyber security and that future developing trends

• Identification of cyber attack that can affect automotive functioning

• Potential risks on security, safety and privacy, and assess severity

• Telematics Security and Evaluation

• Automotive Secure Development Lifecycle (ASDL)

 

PART OF THE SPEAKERS:

Chris Reeves, Horiba Mira Ltd, UK 
Giuseppe Serio, Security IBM   
Shaun Man, Alibaba
Shoutai Wang, Shanghai JiaoTong University
For detailed information about speakers and topics please  Click Here to Download the Brochure.  
“This event is the ultimate guide to develop China Automotive cyber security strategies. It assesses progression of Automotive cyber security to help you predict future and benefit from the deployment; Understand widely variable of levels of Automotive cyber security deployed in China to help you develop bespoke and interoperable solutions and products to suit the markets; Hear who you should align yourself with for future gains!”
Register Now to meet up with LG Electronics, E-trans, Visteon Corporation, Delphi, CommuniTake, CHINAGPS, Haima Automotive, Cherry Jaguar and Landrover, Mazda Automotive, Audi, Bosch, Auto Navinfo, Dongfeng Automotive, Volvo, Cherry Automotive, Changcheng Automotive, Shanghai General Motors, Volkswagen, PSA Peugeot Citroen,Beijing 95190 Yesway, Pan Asia Technical Automotive Center,  Kaspersky, NXP,  China Telecom, China Unicom, Baidu, Infineon,  SBD, France Ministry of Public Security,  The Third Research Institute of Ministry of Public Security, 360 Security,  China Legend Team, China Blackhat Alliance, Alibaba, ..etc.
For registration information about the “CACSS 2016” please contact with Coco Liu at Tel: +86 21 5271 0279, Cell: 13918410123 or email to coco@grccinc.com or visit http://www.acss2016.grccinc.com/index/?en=1
CACSS 2016 is a sister event of “The 5thAnnual Telematics Summit” hold on 10-11 Sep and organized by Genesis Resourcing Consulting China this year. During that Summit the connected car industry colleagues are all concerning the automotive cyber security issues. As the General Manager of China Mobile spoke during the event that without the successful solving the security problem, the China government will intervene the development of connected car industry and then will make the industry development getting even harder. Therefore under the requirement of China automotive OEMs, we plan to produce and organize the “China Automotive Cyber Security Summit”, which will gather 200+ Automotive OEMs, Tier 1 suppliers, Automotive security solution/ technology/products developers,IT companies, Mobile data suppliers, Automotive insurance companies, and automotive cyber security experts to address government regulations developing trends, Automotive cyber security standards, updated vulnerabilities, “Black Hat” behavior motivations, State-of-the-Art technology solutions, critical cyber security challenges and collaboration initiatives, to help to understand tailored smart car cyber security products and solutions, build up a set of effective cyber security management system and improve the capability of protecting smart cars. Tihs event is the only dedicated and focus the event wihtin China connected car industry.
For the past 5 years we have been holding undisputed annual event for the connected care telematics ecosystem. In the largest and most high-profile gathering for automotive and tier 1 telematics executives, we guarantee this event will be the hub from which new contacts, partnerships and strategy are made, with 2016 set to be bigger than ever! We now have limited sponsorship opportunities for you to market your branding, change or enhance your images and build up leadership position in the industry at our event.
For more sponsorship information please contact Ms.Coco Liu at +86 21 5271 0279 or Cell: +86 13918410123 or email to coco@grccinc.com
Best Regards
The organising committee are looking forward to meet you in March Shanghai!

2 reasons why M&A and partnerships in the Automotive Cyber Security Market will continue in 2016

As indicated in our latest report ‘Automotive Cyber Security Market Forecast 2015-2025: the secure connected car’’, the marketplace experienced strong interest in 2015, not only from OEMs and Tier 1s but from other stakeholders.

We expect that in 2016 demand for Automotive Cyber Security experts will be much stronger leading to the formation of new partnerships and/or further M&A.

2016 starts with the acquisition of TowerSec by Harman

On Jan 5, 2016 HARMAN announced it is acquiring TowerSec, an automotive cyber security company. According to source, TowerSec’s technology, primarily the ECUSHIELD and TCUSHIELD, will be integrated into HARMAN’s 5+1 security architecture to protect connected and autonomous cars.

2 reasons why M&A and partnerships will continue in 2016

With a government mandate in the horizon, carmakers will face an additional cost from having to integrate cyber security solutions into their future Connected Car offerings. Automotive Cyber Security expertise though is rare among their Tier-1 suppliers therefore demand for car cybersecurity experts will increase. This will probably lead to more partnerships or M&A over the next few years as carmakers tend to prefer having all the expertise in-house.


‘’We should see automotive cyber security solutions becoming part of mainstream vehicles’ standard equipment as early as 2016’’

Dr Anuja Sonalker, VP of Engineering and Operations at TowerSec


What is more, the viability and successful monetisation of Connected Car business models requires the incorporation of robust automotive cyber expertise and the capability to implement cyber security. This will attract further investment for cyber security experts, either in terms of capital or personnel.

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Read more in our new report:

Automotive Cyber Security Market Forecast 2015-2025: the secure Connected Car

Contact us on: (+44) (0)20 3286 4562, info@auto2xtech.com or visit auto2xtech.com


 

Has the automotive industry done enough to secure Connected Cars against cyber-attacks from organised crime?

If ‘’white-hat’’ researchers can hack cars, so can sophisticated organised crime

While carmakers compete fiercely in the Connected Car arena, malicious cyber-attacks on cars from organised crime can and will move from a possibility to reality. Why is it inevitable?

Simply because we expect a proliferation of Connected Cars over the next ten years and considering that more than once ‘’white hat’’ researchers have demonstrated that modern Connected Cars can be hacked, there are many reasons to worry about. To put it simply, in many cases the existing in-network security needs an upgrade to withstand the new cyber-threats that arise from the introduction of the Cyber-Physical System.

Additionally, the amount of personal data (e.g. preferences, behaviour, location, even credit card details) collected and distributed over the network by Connected Cars will increase significantly over the next decade as the Internet-of-Cars develops (OTA, V2V, V2I, Autonomous).

Finally, as the number of connected-to-the-car devices increases, the vehicle’s attack vector will grow exponentially. And what’s worse, what we call Peripheral car cybersecurity will never be 100% robust. Even the smallest breach in car cybersecurity, whether it’s in-vehicle, peripheral and/or cloud security, is enough to draw the attention of sophisticated criminals who look for opportunities to monetize vulnerabilities.


 

Automotive Cyber Security is a far more than just ‘’researchers demonstrating what researchers can do”. We need real-world counter-measures to protect against sophisticated organised crime.

Mike Parris, Head of SBD Secure Car


 

What needs to be done to secure Connected Cars?

What we need is collaborative, proactive, car cybersecurity implemented by a layered-approach to guarantee security and data privacy. This, can included industry-wide standards, mandatory fitment of robust software and/or hardware solutions and certification of peripheral devices among others to protect against network-based threats (LTE), local area-based (Bluetooth, WiFi, etc.) and open software attacks respectively.

However, it is important for consumers to understand that this approach will not eliminate cyber threats, but it can reduce organised crime’s incentives to attack cars as their probability of success and their gain from infiltrating car security will decrease significantly.

 


A multi-layer approach is always a good practice, starting with a holistic process of security by design which involves addressing potential threats right from the requirement and design phase of products

Asaf Atzmon, VP of Business Development, TowerSec


 

Where are we now? And where are we going to?

Has the automotive industry done enough to protect Connected Cars against cyber-attacks? What is the status of the Automotive Cyber Security market in terms of penetration, demand-supply of solutions and market competition? How the cost of fitting cybersecurity solutions affects carmakers’ decisions?

In a nutshell, no official regulation or common standards exist yet but the auto industry is working on voluntary privacy principles which will take effect in January.

But many signs show that the market has the potential to grow exponential over the next 5 years. First, demand for penetration testing and product integration by OEMs is increasing, as a response to the car hackings (and their consequences on brand reputation).

 


In the last six months, the awareness level has risen much higher in the industry. We see a lot more activity in terms of the penetration testing requests we receive and also in terms of evaluation of our product.

Ziv Levi, CEO Arilou Technologies Ltd


 

Additionally, regulatory action has started to develop in the US and Japan while automotive industry standards are already being discussed.

At the same time, we observe significant investment, partnerships, and M&A in the marketplace which demonstrate that key stakeholders are developing their strategies and placing their bets for the years to come.

To get answers to these questions read our new report:

Automotive Cyber Security Market Forecast: the secure Connected Car. Contact us on:

(+44) (0)20 3286 4562 info@auto2xtech.com or visit auto2xtech.com

 

Different Hardware Solutions and Its Applications in Successfully Protecting Connected Car against Cyber Attacks

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The Connected Car, as part of a Smarter World, is highly connected to and interacting with its environment. It brings enormous promises for increased comfort, safety and efficiency. But it also raises questions regarding security and privacy: like all connected device, it also becomes a target for attackers.

Most vehicle hacks actually consists of a number of smaller steps. It usually starts with finding a vulnerability (a ‘bug’) in a system that is remotely accessible. But once you get for example into a car’s telematics unit, you have a good chance of getting into just about any other part of the car such as the ECUs that control engine speed, braking, cruise control, valet parking etc. Therefore, a “defense-in-depth” strategy shall be applied, applying multiple security techniques at different levels in the system, to mitigate the risk of one component of the defense being compromised or circumvented. This means that countermeasures must be applied at the wireless interfaces, but also in the in-vehicle network and individual ECUs (computers).

Although certain security features can be implemented in software, hardware support is required in most cases: sometimes for performance reasons, but more often also for security reasons. Updatability of software is, on the one hand, a powerful feature that allows the manufacturer to manage the product during its entire lifecycle. But at the same this updatability also provides hackers with a means to manipulate the product. Furthermore, software on its own cannot protect against more advanced (physical, invasive) attacks.

Mr Timo van Roermund, the Security Architect of NXP’s business unit Automotive will elaborate on the different hardware solutions and how they can be used to successfully protect the Connected Car protected against cyber attacks, making the Connected Car an opportunity for business and society rather than a threat to us all, in the upcoming event “The China Automotive Cyber Security Summit”(CACSS2016) to be held on 21-22 Jan. 2016 in Shanghai.

CACSS2016 a sister event of our “The 5thAnnual Telematics Summit” hold on 10-11 Sep this year. CACSS2016 will provide a platform for Automotive OEMs, Tier 1 suppliers, Automotive security solution/technology/products developers,IT companies, Mobile data suppliers, Automotive insurance companies, and automotive cyber security experts to address government regulations developing trends, Automotive cyber security standards, updated vulnerabilities, “Black Hat” behavior motivations, State-of-the-Art technology solutions, critical cyber security challenges and collaboration initiatives; Help you to understand tailored smart car cyber security products and solutions, develop a set of effective cyber security management system, improve the capability of protecting smart cars, and build up sustainable and profitable business partnership.

For the past 5 years we have been holding undisputed annual event for the connected care telematics ecosystem. In the largest and most high-profile gathering for automotive and tier 1 telematics executives, we guarantee this event will be the hub from which new contacts, partnerships and strategy are made, with 2016 set to be bigger than ever!

For more information please contact Coco Liu at Tel: +86 21 5271 0279

Email: coco@grccinc.com

Event Website: http://www.acss2016.grccinc.com/index/

4 reasons why car cybersecurity solutions will experience strong demand over the next decade

The era of the Connected Car is here but the next big step of autonomous driving requires multiple layers of security against malicious cyber-attacks and enhanced data privacy, which are largely absent from carmakers’ offerings. However, in the wake of the recent car hacking events (Jeep hack, BMW, GM and Tesla), regulatory action has started to move faster in the US, with other advanced car markets expected to follow.

Recent hacking events will accelerate mandatory fitment of cyber security solutions in advanced car markets

With the SPY Act proposing rule-making within 18 months and final regulations within 3 years of the act’s enactment, there is high probability that fitment of cyber security solutions in new vehicles in the US will become mandatory before 2020.

We expect that regulatory action in Europe and Japan will follow, but after some clear requirements have been established in the US. The ENISA has already agreed with BMW to work on Connected Cars, whereas in Japan the IAC Ministry is working on car cybersecurity guidelines. As fitment of cyber security solutions becomes mandatory, demand for both software and hardware-based solutions will be strong over the next decade and new business models for connected devices will emerge.

 


Timeline of key cybersecurity regulatory events in 2015

Feb 2015 | The SPY Act was introduced to the US Senate by US Senators Edward Markey (D-Mass) and Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn)

Jul 2015 | The Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers’ Auto-ISAC will begin operations in S2-2015

Sep 2015 | The Japanese Internal Affairs & Communications Ministry works on car-hacking guidelines

Oct 2015 | The US Senate passes the (S.754) Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act

Oct 2015 | The European agency ENISA will start working on car data cybersecurity in 2016

Nov 2015 | Rep. Ted Lieu, D-Calif., introduced the Security and Privacy in Your Car Study Act

Nov 2015 | Toyota, Tesla and GM testified before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform on the “Internet of Cars”

Dec 2015 | SAE International announced its guidelines (J3061) on Cybersecurity


 

Cyber security product integration in early adopters’ vehicles to come as early as 2016

Responding to recent car hackings, several OEMs, such as Tesla Motors and Daimler, have assigned third parties to conduct threat-penetration and vulnerability analysis in their vehicles. Demand for penetration testing & vulnerability assessments is peaking momentum according to our interviews with executives from Automotive Cyber Security solution suppliers. We expect that by the end of 2016, most of the currently ongoing or announced penetration tests will have finished, similarly to product evaluation for most OEMs. Therefore, talks about product integration will begin for their next-generation vehicles.

Enhanced supply of software, hardware-based solutions and services-frameworks 

More cybersecurity solutions are now available to carmakers as new companies have entered the marketplace in the past 5 years. Most companies are head-quartered in developed car markets, such as the US, Germany and the UK, and in Israel; one of the leading hubs for cyber security globally. Moreover, some of the solutions offered by Cyber Security companies are cutting-edge. There are frameworks that could assist OEMs mitigate cyber security threats, as well as a number of software and hardware solutions that OEMs could embed (or integrate) into their offerings.

Automotive Cyber Security needs to be proactive to dis-incentivise attacks in the in-vehicle network by organised crime

With Connected Car penetration rising fast but car cybersecurity still relatively weak, cars are susceptible to cyber-threats from organised crime. Additionally, the proliferation of personal data stored and transmitted in the car increases organised crime’s incentive to attack vehicles. Therefore, ‘’proactive’’ cyber-attack protection substitutes ‘’keep them out’’ as the leading strategy. This trend will benefit suppliers of detection and prevention cyber security solutions.

What does that mean for growth in the Automotive Cyber Security market?

We assess that in the wake of the recent car hacks by cyber security researchers and US Senator Markey’s report on the vulnerability of modern vehicles to malicious attacks, Automotive Cyber Security will unfold as the key topic in OEMs and suppliers’ agenda for the immediate future. We also expect that the competitive landscape will alter significantly from its current status through M&A and the formation on new partnerships.

The key challenges here are how quickly the level of security and privacy in Connected Cars will rise to sufficient levels to avoid having vulnerable vehicles. Furthermore, how the cost of embedding cyber security solutions to new vehicles will affect OEMs, consumers and other key automotive stakeholders.

For more information read our new report:

Automotive Cyber Security Market Forecast 2015-2025: the secure Connected Car

Auto2x publishes the Automotive Cyber Security Market Forecast 2015-2025 report

London, Oct 2015

Over the next decade, as automobile-driving progresses from Connected and Assisted to highly and fully-automated, the protection of the vehicle’s augmented ‘’attack surface’’ will become a top priority for carmakers and regulators. Thus, vehicle safety will expand from passive and active to yet another dimension, that of security against cyber threats, which also includes data privacy.

This is because holistic safety, security and privacy are incremental features for consumer acceptance of these new automotive technologies. They are also paramount for the viability of OEMs’ investment and critical for the transition towards more autonomous and eventually self-driving cars.

Additionally, as V2V and Vehicle-to-Infrastructure communications expand, another segment in the Automotive Cyber Security market will be unveiled, one that also needs to be addressed now.

 


”Amid the expansion of the vehicle’s attack surface resulting from the proliferation of Connected Cars and Connected devices, OEMs need to address malicious cyber-attacks from organised crime. This means that they will have to rely more on automotive cyber security companies with expertise in this field, since Tier-1s’ expertise is also limited. The outcome will be the formation of new partnerships, M&A and further investment in the Automotive Cyber Security market.”

Georgios Stathousis, Automotive Consultant, Auto2x

 

We assess that in the wake of the recent car hacks by cyber security researchers and US Senator Markey’s report on the vulnerability of modern vehicles to malicious attacks, Automotive Cyber Security will unfold as the key topic in OEMs and suppliers’ agenda for the immediate future.

Moreover, we expect that the competitive landscape will alter significantly from its current status through M&A, the formation of new partnerships, and new investments. Consequently, new business models and opportunities will arise.

The key challenges here are how quickly the level of security and privacy in Connected Cars will rise to sufficient levels to avoid having vulnerable vehicles. Furthermore, how the cost of embedding cyber security solutions to new vehicles will affect OEMs, consumers and other key automotive stakeholders.

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What This Report Delivers

Our 70 page report identifies the drivers that will fuel growth in the Automotive Cyber Security market over the next decade and provides a roadmap of adoption for Cyber Security solutions for Connected Cars.

Additionally, it delivers an insight into the evolution of the market landscape, drawing conclusions from a panel of industry experts and our in-house expertise.

To request a Table of Contents and Sample Pages contact us:

(+44) (0)20 3286 4562 info@auto2xtech.com or visit auto2xtech.com